Rambox

Caracas
theorganon:

كلمن: pronounced ka-la-mon
Kalamon is the fourth word of the famous Arabic pangram, the Abjad Hawwaz. Abjad Hawwaz is the original order of the Arabic letters as derived from the order of the Phoenican language, which changed when dots were added to the Arabic letters. It consists of 30 letters (of which 2 letters are repeated) grouped into eight words. Other Phoenican-derived alphabets, such as the Hebrew alphabet, currently still use this order (except that in Hebrew, the letters are not grouped into words, and the last six letters, of Abjad Hawwaz do not exist).
An interesting characteristic about Semitic alphabets (or more accurately, Phoenican-derived alphabets) is that (mostly) everything has a meaning - even individual letters have meanings in their names and are (or were) shaped according to their meanings. The Arabs, using that same sense, gave the eight words of Abjad Hawwaz meanings.
Abjad أبجد: took [the knowledge]
Hawwaz هوّز: joined [the knowledge]
Hutty حطّي: stood [at the point (of the information)]
Kalamon كلمن: became educated
Sa’fis سعفص: learned quickly
Qurishat قرشت: learned by heart
Thakhthun ثخذ: memorized
Dathaghu ضظغ: finished
The purpose of joining the letters into eight meaningful words was to get learners of the language accustomed to the irregularities in it after having learned words that followed the same pattern - because these eight words are somewhat unusual to learners; having mostly quadrant roots. While the purpose of joining the letters into sequential words was probably a form of motivation and inspiration.
A mythological story says that Abjad, Hawwaz, Hutty, Kalamon, Sa’fis, and Qurishat were kings in Madyan, located in the northwestern parts of the Arabian Peninsula (modern day Tabuk), and that Kalamon was their..sort of..King of Kings. The story says that these people formed the Arabic alphabet and writing system according to their names, and then later on, created 6 new letters and added them to the alphabet, thus, having 28 letters (6 letters more than the original 22 Phoenican letters), which were grouped into the two words: Thakhth, and Dathagh.
 
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theorganon:

كلمن: pronounced ka-la-mon

Kalamon is the fourth word of the famous Arabic pangram, the Abjad Hawwaz. Abjad Hawwaz is the original order of the Arabic letters as derived from the order of the Phoenican language, which changed when dots were added to the Arabic letters. It consists of 30 letters (of which 2 letters are repeated) grouped into eight words. Other Phoenican-derived alphabets, such as the Hebrew alphabet, currently still use this order (except that in Hebrew, the letters are not grouped into words, and the last six letters, of Abjad Hawwaz do not exist).

An interesting characteristic about Semitic alphabets (or more accurately, Phoenican-derived alphabets) is that (mostly) everything has a meaning - even individual letters have meanings in their names and are (or were) shaped according to their meanings. The Arabs, using that same sense, gave the eight words of Abjad Hawwaz meanings.

  1. Abjad أبجد: took [the knowledge]
  2. Hawwaz هوّز: joined [the knowledge]
  3. Hutty حطّي: stood [at the point (of the information)]
  4. Kalamon كلمن: became educated
  5. Sa’fis سعفص: learned quickly
  6. Qurishat قرشت: learned by heart
  7. Thakhthun ثخذ: memorized
  8. Dathaghu ضظغ: finished

The purpose of joining the letters into eight meaningful words was to get learners of the language accustomed to the irregularities in it after having learned words that followed the same pattern - because these eight words are somewhat unusual to learners; having mostly quadrant roots. While the purpose of joining the letters into sequential words was probably a form of motivation and inspiration.

A mythological story says that Abjad, Hawwaz, Hutty, Kalamon, Sa’fis, and Qurishat were kings in Madyan, located in the northwestern parts of the Arabian Peninsula (modern day Tabuk), and that Kalamon was their..sort of..King of Kings. The story says that these people formed the Arabic alphabet and writing system according to their names, and then later on, created 6 new letters and added them to the alphabet, thus, having 28 letters (6 letters more than the original 22 Phoenican letters), which were grouped into the two words: Thakhth, and Dathagh.

 

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(Source: kolkhara, via arabswagger)

arabswagger:

Girl: “Oh you sat here I see?”
Mohammad Assaf: “Yup!”

(Source: rz-1995)

The invisible bike helmet.